Maine CDL Practice Test

CDL Practice Test

Maine.How to Get a Maine CDL License? Obtaining a commercial driver’s license (CDL) in Maine requires passage of a skills and knowledge test based upon the type of commercial motor vehicles (CMV) being driven. Federal law requires that CDL drivers crossing state lines must be 21 years of age. States may set different age limits for commercial drivers that operate solely within the state.

Maine follows federal guidelines that provide for three classifications of CMVs as described below.

Class A-Any combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.

Class B-Any single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR.

Class C-Any single vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of Class A or Class B, but is either designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver, or is transporting material that has been designated as hazardous.

Note:A bus may be either Class B or Class C depending on whether the GVWR is 26,001 pounds or more.

CDL Classes for Every State

You must be able to read and speak English well enough to read road signs, prepare reports, and communicate with the public and with law enforcement. The Act established three separate classes of commercial driver’s licenses. Every state issues licenses in these categories: Class A: Any combination of vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating (GWVR) of 26,001 lbs or more, provided the GVWR of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 lbs.
Class B: Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs or more, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 lbs GVWR.
Class C: Any single vehicle, or combination of vehicles, that does not meet the definition of Class A or Class B, but is either designed to transport 16 passengers or more, including the driver, or is placarded for hazardous materials.
Many states make exceptions for farm vehicles, snow removal vehicles, fire and emergency vehicles, and some military vehicles.

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